Posts tagged ‘Ohiyesa’

Detective 164 – the Bat-Signal, Roy Raymond as a child, and Great Owl tells a story

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I love the cover for Detective 164 (Oct. 50).  The story is one of numerous within the next couple of years that deal with some specific item of Batman’s arsenal or accoutrements.

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The story opens with an editor complaining about declining sales, and demanding more of the writer, which probably reflects reality.  By 1950 almost all superheroes had vanished.

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The rest of the story is a series of short tales, in which the Bat-signal is used in as many ways as they could think of, in taking down criminals.  There is even a diagram of the signal and its properties.

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Roy Raymond deals with Marvella, a woman who claims to be able to talk to the dead in this Impossible But True story.  Very little background is ever given for Roy Raymond, so the little bit in this story is a gift.

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To prove to Raymond that her powers are real, she calls up his dead Uncle William, and has his voice emerge from a cat.  He accurately recounts a shared memory of William and young Raymond, which we see in flashback.

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Still, it’s a con, and Roy explains it all in the end.  But the memory was Roy’s, so it remains canon.

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This is a fun variation on the format for Pow-Wow Smith, with art by Bruno Premani.

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The story of Ohiyesa’s tracking and battle with some thieves is told by aged Great Owl to a group of young children in the camp.  Great Owl refers to everything by its “native” equivalent.  The airplane is a great eagle, for example.

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So the story is twice-told, back and forth, as we see the real events, and the way the kids imagine it.

Detective 156 – The Batmobile of 1950, the girl who could talk to animals, and Pow-Wow Smith and the gold dust robbery

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It’s time for a new Batmobile in Detective 156 (Feb. 50).

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The old model gets wrecked in a chase, which also leaves Batman in a cast.  He sets to work building a top of the line, brand new modern car.

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This Dick Sprang designed Batmobile can go faster than the previous one, and has a turbo boost for jumps, so it would have been able to make the jump that trashed the earlier car.

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It also has a monitor, linked to a massive camera that Robin wears as he tracks down the thieves.  Batman follows in the car, smashing through the wall to save Robin and take down the bad guys in the nick of time.

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A couple of deceptions are going on in this chapter of Impossible But True.  Roy Raymond investigates the story of a girl who shows up, having been raised with wild animals and able to talk with them.

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There is also a storyline about a manhunt for a murderer, and the only witness to the crime was the victim’s pet.  Roy arranges for the woman to meet with the pet, but the killer steps in.

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And that was the plan all along.  Roy exposed the girl as a hoax, a Hollywood promo stunt, but got them to work with him on drawing out the killer.

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Great new logo for Pow-Wow Smith, thanks to Carmine Infantino.

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When thieves steal bags of gold dust, the sheriff in the area summons a posse to track them down, and so Ohiyesa dons his Pow-Wow Smith garb to join in.

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The story itself is not as significant as the ending, in which the thief calls Smith a “stupid Indian.”  This is the first glimpse of the racism he faces, and the series would touch on it from time to time.

 

 

Detective 153 – Batman flies, Robotman fights his double, Impossible But True begins, and vengeance comes for Ohiyesa

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Great cover for this Dick Sprang story in Detective 153 (Nov. 49).  Batman and Robin are searching for an escaped felon, but take time out to attend a lecture on bats.  Just as the professor shows off some bat-wings he has created, the bad guy shows up.  Batman attempts to get to him, but she shoots his rope, and Batman falls, allowing the guy to escape.

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The professor gives him the bat-wings, and off Batman flies.

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Robin gets captured, but the professor has also provided a bat-radar system, which Batman uses to navigate a trapped room.

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And then, just as you are wondering how they are going to justify not keeping this cool stuff, Batman wakes up.  It was all a dream.  Lame.

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Robotman is pitted against a double of himself, when a scientist friend constructs a similar body, and implants the brain of a recently deceased man.

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The man inside the new body turns out to be a criminal, and a pretty fanatical one.  He takes no time to try to conceal his evil plans, announcing them to everyone.  Good thing he did, because Robotman knows to attack him right away.

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In attempting to electrocute Robotman, the new robot-man kills himself instead.

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Impossible But True begins in this issue, with art by Ruben Moreira.  The series stars Roy Raymond, and would come to be called that.  Roy has a hit tv show (Impossible But True) on which he shows off amazing things, and disproves hoaxes, along with his assistant, Karen Duncan.

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Looking for something good for next week’s show, Roy comes across a letter claiming there is a valley which ages people while they are in it.

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Roy sets out to investigate, entering the valley and experiencing the effect himself.

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The story closes with the broadcast of the episode, and the complex (and almost as unbelievable) explanation of what was really going on.

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Trouble comes looking for Pow-Wow Smith in this Carmine Infantino story, as a man he had captured escapes on his way to the gallows, and comes seeking revenge.

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The man disguises himself as a native.  He disguises himself, and is lucky enough to come at the time of a festival.

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He lures Ohiyesa out of the camp, and cuts a rope, so he will fall to his death.  He returns to the camp and announces that Ohiyesa has died.

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Which of course, he hasn’t, and shows up just in time.  They fight, the disguise comes off, and the Mexican is revealed.  At Ohiyesa’s insistence, they return him to the whites for justice, and he finally gets hung.

Aside from the very start and end, this story takes place entirely with the Sioux.

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